Spring 2017: freaking cold

So winter wasn’t too bad this year and, while I know I’ve said we somehow seem to skip spring and go straight to summer here in Halifax, this year I do believe we have spring! I don’t know how to explain it really, maybe I’m just getting used to it. That said, it’s below normal cold. But hey, the garden grows!

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Peas coming up under protection of prayer flags (they keep the birds out).

Beets under the Wire

Beets, slowly but surely, pushing through. Chicken wire keeps the cats out.

Lettuce Seedlings

Lettuce. Chicken wire will stay on until the plants are big enough to take up their space.

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Garlic, planted last fall, off to a good start.

Meanwhile, pain in the ass that it is because they take over the house, tender veggies have been started indoors. I should be able to plant them out in a couple of weeks. Click the pics for captions.

Other than the veggies, I’ve been keeping busy with post-winter cleanup and welcoming the perennials…

So snow shovels are away for another year and gardening tools have been resurrected. Now I’m going to go plant the onions.

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Winter’s over, spring has sprung…the gardener and her extraordinary assistant.

Picture Perfect

In the middle of the worst winter in a bazillion years, my partner and I decided we had to partake in an introductory insanely cheap flight to Scotland. Problem is we could only get tickets for July, prime gardening time. But winter will do crazy things to you and we bought the tickets. Now having just returned, the garden overflows and I have done nothing but weed for the past week. Oh, and harvest.

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Broccoli, lettuce, kale, and garlic scapes harvested the first afternoon we were home from our trip.

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Lettuce, beans, and kale, oh my!

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Carrots, parsnips, beets in the front bed; lettuce and beans in the next. There’s a bed of broccoli down there, corn, garlic, sunchokes; onions, leeks, and more garlic over in the top right corner. Click the pic to see better.

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One of the heads of broccoli.

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One of 2 beds of garlic. Scapes have all been harvested, garlic soon to be.

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Never having grown currants before, I’m not sure when I should pick them. At least one robin has been checking them out but hasn’t touched them yet.

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The oregano has gone crazy. Lots of different pollinators appear to love crazy when it comes to the herbs but I think I’ll be cutting it back severely come fall.

And speaking of pollinators, what would a garden be without flowers…

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Rudbeckia. This is always swarming with bees.

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Beebalm. Beloved by both hummingbirds and bees.

IMG_3068 'Jackmanii Superba'

I just planted this Clematis maybe 6 weeks ago, nothing more than a few little twigs. I wasn’t even sure it would bloom this year.

IMG_3116 Filipendula rubra ‘Venusta’

The majestic Filipendula.

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Astilbe, given to me by my friend, Ed. I have another one out front under which wasps built a nest last year. Here’s to them staying away this year.

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Teasel. I’m not crazy about it because it’s so hard to deal with but the bees love it and I’m all about keeping the bees happy.

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And speaking of bees, I’ll let this one, sucking on the comfrey, have the last word.

Today was a  perfect day for playing in the garden…a mixture of sun and cloud, temperature neither hot nor cold, I had a couple of hours to spare, PLUS there were pansies volunteering themselves into the mostly weed lawn!

Volunteered pansies.

Volunteered pansies.

Another plant that’s very happy this time of year is the , AKA red lungwort. And I’m very happy to see it because once we hit the heat of summer, the lungwort acts like it would rather hide out in a cave. It’s a shade loving plant and it doesn’t like heat but look how lovely it looks now…

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Pulmonaria rubra ‘Redstart’

After admiring the newly arrived plants, I sowed some beet seeds in a bed with some extra space between what I’m calling the “surprise” brassica because I don’t know exactly what the seeds are (got them from a Seedy Saturday event) and the sorrel that will not give up no matter how many slugs survive the winter by nibbling on it.

And speaking of slugs, if you don’t know the coffee grounds trick and are having trouble with slugs (and snails too, I believe), it’s worth a try. Just sprinkle coffee grounds around plants that you notice slugs find tasty. It seems to work. It’s a line drawn they just won’t cross. It’ll look something like this…

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The coffee grounds are the darker brown colour. Just sprinkle them so they’re like a moat around the plants you’re trying to protect.

I found these as I was cleaning up some of the veggie beds:

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It’s always good to remember where you planted the carrots in the fall. They are at their sweetest when you dig them up come spring.

 

Harvest 2013

It’s harvest time from our first year in the garden. We’ve been blessed with parsnips, carrots, tomatoes, 3 different kind of beans, peas, broccoli, beets, kale, all kinds of greens, onions, and of course garlic.

We’ve given away food and now we’re figuring out the best way to store food for the winter. We’re making soups, canning, and freezing.

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Cold weather predicted for tonight (Sept 23) so brought in the rest of the tomatoes, gave some away, made relish and chow chow with the rest. Oh, let some ripen.

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Baby corn picked by Evie. Corn not successful but cute anyway.

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Weeding the broccoli helps route out pests and slugs.

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Picked a bunch of tomatoes when they were still mostly green and made some Green Tomato Chutney.

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Nothing more beautiful than dirty parsnips!

Garlic is a standard.

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We had SO many tomatoes this year!

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Beets (and their greens) were a favourite.