Introducing…baby veggies

What can I say? We
started late but here they come.
Let’s appreciate.

(It not only rhymes, sort of, but hey, it’s also a haiku.)

babyBROC

Baby broccoli.

babyPEPP

Baby peppers.

babyTOM

Baby tomatoes.

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Baby blueberry that seems to be calling for some food of its own.

babySQUASH

Baby squash.

babyKIWI

Baby kiwis.

1stGARLIC

Test harvest of the garlic. They’re ready.

So that’s the next big task… harvest the 2 beds of garlic, dry it briefly in the sun, hang it in bunches in the basement until it’s ready to be stored. Meanwhile we continue to harvest all the various greens and herbs as we wait for the babies to grow up.

2014 Vegetable Garden Is In

It’s been weeks since I’ve posted anything here and, at this time of year, that can only mean one thing: spring finally arrived and I’ve been busy in the garden! It was a long time coming this year. In my impatience and frustration, I lost a few plants to late frosts. I learned, though, that tomatoes and tomatillos are hardier than I think. I put them out too early and they struggled with that same late frost that killed all but one of the zucchinis. But the tomatoes survived and are now flowering. Hardy as they may sometimes appear, I do not intend to push my luck. Next year I will plant them later, after all signs of frost have gone. Why make them suffer?

Tomatillo plant finally on the other side of late spring frosts.

Tomatillo plant finally on the other side of late spring frosts.

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By the time the 2nd frost warning came around, I decided to cover the zukes but it was really too late. They were never able to fully recover.

We are definitely over the hump and quick approaching the first days of summer. The vegetables are coming into their own with beans, peas, tomatoes, kale and all kinds of other greens looking all pleased with themselves. Carrots, onions, parsnips all good. My big fat fail continues to be the squash family. I couldn’t stop them from growing on the west coast and for the 2 years I’ve been here (Nova Scotia), I’ve been completely unsuccessful. This years it’s the slugs … ate the leaves right of the baby cucumber seedlings as they appeared. I’m waiting to see if they recover. Meanwhile, I go slug hunting at dusk. I’ve been clearing out all the straw mulch where they like to hang out. And I keep drinking lots of coffee so I can use the grounds as slug deterrent (see previous post).

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Chives just starting to flower in this photo. They are now in full bloom. I’ve watched baby crows try to pull the flowers right out of the ground! I have no idea what the attraction is but they were not successful.

Last yea's kale sprouting up new delicious leaves.

Last year’s kale sprouting up new delicious leaves.

Last year's kale already attracting pollinators.

Last year’s kale already attracting pollinators.

And for those veggies that can’t over-winter, that I start indoors from seed, that need to be hardened off before being planted in the ground, there’s this:

Plastic portable greenhouse worked beautifully for hardening off plants...I didn't have to bring them in every night! Gift from a neighbour.

Plastic portable greenhouse worked beautifully for hardening off plants…I didn’t have to bring them in every night, I just zipped them up and unzipped them in the morning! Gift from a neighbour.

Note: To harden something off is to inure a plant to cold by gradually increasing its exposure to it.

Spring is Peeking

Yes, it has been a really long and harsh-for-Halifax kind of winter but just as the bravest of the plants are starting to peek out from under their protective mulch, so go I. Twice now I have been out in the garden in a tank top and steel-toed boots cleaning up the detritus (I’ve always wanted to use that word in a sentence). While the perennials may be far behind where they were this time last year, the important thing is that they’re here.

After a little cleanup of dead stalks and mulch, voila...chives! Always the first green I see in the veggie garden. And we've already sampled them...scrambled eggs and chives!

After a little cleanup of dead stalks and mulch, voila…chives! Always the first green I see in the veggie garden. And we’ve already sampled them…scrambled eggs and chives!

Garlic finally peeking out through the mulch.

Look for the green… garlic finally peeking out through the mulch. Last year’s were 5 times the height by now.

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Tulips and daffodils never let me down. They’re later this year too, of course, but later is better than never.

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I’ve never been a big fan of crocuses (crocii?) and this is the first year I planted them. I’m still not a fan but seeing their blooms is beyond delightful when there’s still snow on the ground.

 

seedlings

Meanwhile, inside I’ve got the tomatoes going as well as some squash and goji berries. Goji berries are a first for me and, while apparently almost indestructible once planted out, the suggestion is that they stay indoors for the first year.

Spring?

Friends kept telling us that Halifax didn’t really have spring. That it just sort of goes from winter into summer. One day the trees are bare and the next they’re full of leaves. How could that be? we’d ask. You’ll see, they’d say knowingly.

After experiencing my first spring here, I see what they mean. You have to experience it to really get it. I mean, it’s spring. Plants come up. Well, plants come up that would come up even if winter continued.

daffies

Yellow daffodils, white tulips by the back steps.

tulips (1) tulips

But winter seems to hang on for all it’s worth. My indoor seedlings are outgrowing every pot that I put them in. But finally…it’s time to transplant them outside. Whether it’s time or not, it’s time. It’s time for me. I can’t wait anymore. And before you know it, tiny seedlings are growing into food.

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Tomato seedlings, snap peas to the right.

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New greens coming in, garlic in the bed behind.

squash

Squash seedlings in front of tomatoes. Prayer flags protecting baby beans from crows.